X

Skull & Bones: The Costly Voyage of Ubisoft's Elusive Game

Ah, Skull & Bones, the game that sailed through the treacherous waters of development Hell. It's a tale of reshuffles, reboots, and redos that see...

Lauren Bergin

Feb 11, 2024

Skull & Bones: The Costly Voyage of Ubisoft's Elusive Game

Ah, Skull & Bones, the game that sailed through the treacherous waters of development Hell. It's a tale of reshuffles, reboots, and redos that seems to have no end. Ubisoft, the company known for making great games, and questionable decisions, has been promising Skull & Bones for what feels like an eternity. The game's long and troubled journey, coupled with rolling layoffs, is a testament to the challenging process of its creation. Oh, the woes of Ubisoft, where making money and relating to normal human beings seem to elude their executives.

But let's talk about Ubisoft's CEO, Yves Guillemot, for a moment. The man recently claimed that Skull & Bones deserves a higher price tag because it's a "quadruple-A" game. Quadruple-A? Seriously? In the same breath, he also assured players that Skull & Bones is a "fully-fledged game" and a "very big game." Hold on a second, Yves. You can't have it both ways. You can't say, "This game is more expensive because it's the best of the best," while also saying, "Don't worry, folks! It's a real grown-up game that you can actually play!" If you're still trying to convince people to spend their hard-earned money on a game that took over a decade to make, you might be in trouble.

Now, let's take a moment to appreciate the genius of Yves Guillemot. This is the same man who had to apologize to his own employees for implying that their incompetence caused the company's financial problems and that it was their responsibility to fix it. But fear not! Ubisoft is a company where 25 percent of employees reported facing workplace misconduct, and some former executives were arrested in France after a sexual harassment investigation. Guillemot didn't do those things, of course. He simply brushed the problems off as "generational differences." Ah, the audacity! I know it's a lot to digest, but trust me, rich people don't take it well when you discuss the things they've publicly done.

The point here is that the person claiming, "You'll be spending more money because our game is just that good!" is also the person who said, "It's up to our employees to fix leadership's mistakes." So, let's not assume that Guillemot's use of "quadruple-A" is a genuine expression of good faith. The issue isn't whether the game is good or not; the issue is that Guillemot has a long history of bending reality to dismiss problems faced by employees and consumers. He even puts the blame on them to effect change.

Let's face it: making games is an expensive endeavor. That's why games are becoming increasingly costly. Sure, major companies have become greedier with microtransactions, pre-order bonuses, and paid early access for their most enthusiastic fans. But that doesn't negate the fact that video games are expensive to produce, especially the big ones made by big companies. And when you add in the countless restarts and reboots, which Ubisoft seems to specialize in, the costs skyrocket. Frankly, I don't think we'll be seeing Beyond Good & Evil 2 anytime soon. It's been 21 years since the original, and I'd love to be proven wrong, but Ubisoft's track record doesn't inspire confidence.

Companies need to stop fooling their customers. Just be honest: making games requires money. They are expensive, and developers need to recoup their losses if they want to keep producing more games. It's as simple as that. Stop acting like you're doing everyone a favor by claiming the product is so incredible that consumers should be delighted to spend more on it. It's not like you're giving away a diamond necklace! The value is in the spending! Does anyone actually believe that? No.

The truth is, it often costs more to make a quadruple-A game than it does to make a triple-A movie, and even movies are becoming more expensive. That's part of the reason why ticket prices have increased. It's not the only reason, of course; corporate greed plays a significant role. But telling fans they should be happy to spend more money, instead of admitting that the product they're buying required substantial resources, is just another form of corporate greed.

It's a failure on the part of executives to admit that their own business decisions are responsible for any issues within the company. They're quick to take credit for successes, but when difficulties or controversies arise, employees are told to try harder, and customers are told to keep quiet.

So, let's raise our controllers and demand honesty from the gaming industry. Let's acknowledge that games are expensive to make and support developers in their efforts to deliver quality experiences. And let's not be swayed by claims of quadruple-A greatness or promises thatvast and complete games will magically justify higher price tags. Instead, let's demand transparency and fair pricing while enjoying the artistry and creativity that video games bring to our lives.

POPULAR

The Witcher 4: Unleashing a New Witcher, Unleashing a New Adventure

The Witcher 4: Unleashing a New Witcher, Unleashing a New Adventure

Step aside, Geralt of Rivia! The Witcher franchise is ready to introduce a fresh perspective, a new protagonist who will ignite our imaginations in Th...

Daryl Austin

5 Hours Ago

An Epic Catch and the Magical Bond of Pokemon Go: A Tale of Luck and Family

An Epic Catch and the Magical Bond of Pokemon Go: A Tale of Luck and Family

Imagine, if you will, a Reddit post that set the Pokemon Go community ablaze. A proud trainer by the name of vulczz shared the astonishing accomplishm...

Anthony Gharib

Jan 23, 2024

The Legendary Hunt: Unleashing the Power of Uber Tuning Stones in Diablo 4

The Legendary Hunt: Unleashing the Power of Uber Tuning Stones in Diablo 4

Step into the dark world of Diablo 4, where power and rarity collide in the form of Uber Tuning Stones. Among the 25 Tuning Stones available, two reig...

Mark Molyneux

Jan 25, 2024

Yakuza: Like a Dragon - Conquering Challenges with Style and Stubbornness

Yakuza: Like a Dragon - Conquering Challenges with Style and Stubbornness

Yakuza: Like a Dragon, the latest addition to the Yakuza game series, offers some surprisingly easy completions and platinum trophies. Compared to the...

Marianne Garvey

Feb 13, 2024

Honkai: Star Rail Unveiling Secrets and Mechanical Aristocrats

Honkai: Star Rail Unveiling Secrets and Mechanical Aristocrats

Ladies and gentlemen, gather 'round, for I have a tale to tell from the dazzling world of Honkai: Star Rail. Step into a realm of mystery and exciteme...

Ben Morse

Feb 15, 2024